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W. Robert Taylor MD W. Robert Taylor MD, Ph.D.
Professor

School of Medicine, Division of Cardiology
Emory University School of Medicine
Atlanta, GA 30322

Phone: 404-727-8921
Fax: 404-727-3572
Location: EU: WMB - 319
E-Mail: wtaylor@emory.edu
URL: http://medicine.emory.edu/about_us/our_people/faculty-directory/taylor-w-robert.html

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Areas of Research

    The overall goal of the laboratory is study how various humoral and mechanical factors modulate vascular inflammatory responses as they pertain to the development of atherosclerosis, angiogenesis and hypertensive vascular disease. Specifically, we study the effects of angiotensin II, advanced glycation end products and wall strain on these processes. The specific projects underway include:
    1) The Role of Angiotensin II in the Pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this project we are focusing on the contribution of oxidative stress as a signaling mechanism in atherogenesis. We are also exploring the functional contributions of specific candidate genes.
    2) Mechanical Strain and Vascular Inflammation. We have previously shown that when cyclic strain is applied to vascular smooth muscle cells, it induces the production of reactive oxygen species and an upregulation of proinflammatory genes. We are currently studying the effects of cell phenotype on this response. In addition, we are interested in the mechanical properties of vascular cells of different phenotypes.
    3) Mechanisms of Angiogenesis. Angiogenesis is a complex process involving the growth and arterialization of new blood vessels. We are currently using several animal models to define the roles of osteopontin (an extracellular matrix protein) and angiotensin II in this process.
    4) Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs) and Vascular Inflammation. AGEs are produced after extended periods of hyperglycemia (high blood sugar). We have shown that AGE?s cause a proinflammatory response in the vessel wall. We are currently looking the mechanisms of this response and the role of a specific receptor (RAGE) for AGE?s.
    5) Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Vascular Disease. In this project we are developing new methodologies to isolate and culture human endothelial progenitor cells from the peripheral circulation. These efforts are being coordinated with several clinical trials now underway at Emory. In addition, we are integrating these studies with animal models of vascular disease to further explore the role of circulating endothelial progenitor cells in vascular repair and inflammation.

Educational Background

  • Emory University, Cardiology Fellow, 1988-1992
  • Beth Israel Hospital, Resident in Medicine, 1987-1988
  • Beth Israel Hospital, Intern in Medicine, 1986-1987 Johns Hopkins University, Postdoctoral Fellow, 1981-1982
  • M.D., Harvard Medical School, 1986
  • Ph.D., Physiology, Johns Hopkins University, 1982
  • B.S., University of Maryland, 1978

Selected Awards

  • 2001, Named Dean?s Clinical Investigator, Emory University School of Medicine
  • 1998, North American Vascular Biology Association Young Investigator Award
  • 1997, Elected Fellow of the Council for High Blood Pressure Research
  • 1997, Cardiology Fellows' Teaching Award, Emory University
  • 1996, Cardiology Fellows' Teaching Award, Emory University
  • 1995, Society for Physical Regulation in Biology and Medicine Clinical Investigator Award
  • 1995, American Federation for Aging Research Award
  • 1990, AHA Council for High Blood Pressure Research Fellowship Award
  • 1988, M.D., cum laude

Selected Research Publications

  • Weiss D, Taylor WR. (2008) Deoxycorticosterone acetate salt hypertension in apolipoprotein E-/- mice results in accelerated atherosclerosis: the role of angiotensin II. Hypertension. 51(2):218-24.
  • Duvall CL, Weiss D, Robinson ST, Alameddine MF, Guldberg R, Taylor WR (2008) The Role of Osteopontin in Recovery from Hind Limb Ischemia Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 28(2):290-5.
  • Haghighat A, Weiss D, Whalin MK, Cowan DP, Taylor WR (2007) Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor exacerbate atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice. Circulation 115(15):2049-54.
  • Suo J, Ferrara DE, Sorescu D, Guldberg RE, Taylor WR, Giddens DP (2007) Hemodynamic Shear Stresses in Mouse Aortas. Implications for atherogenesis Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 27(2):346-51.
  • Ferrara DE, Weiss D, Carnell P,Vito R,Vega D,Gao X, Nie S, Taylor WR. (2006) 3D Fluorescence technique for the analysis of en face preparations of arterial walls using quantum dot nanocrystals and two-photon excitation laser scanning microscopy. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 290(1) R114-123.
  • Weiss D, Kools J, and Taylor WR. (2001) Angiotensin II-induced hypertension accelerates the development of atherosclerosis in Apo E-deficient mice. Circulation: 103:448-454.


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